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Category: miscellaneous

Revelatory covers (4th in series): “My One and Only Love”

This “iconic” ballad began life as Music from Beyond the Moon – a 1947 flop. Retitled in 1952, it became famous in 1953, thanks to Frank Sinatra. The “iconic” version was sung in 1963 by Johnny Hartman on John Coltrane and Johnny Hartman. However, the loveliest version is an instrumental duet, recorded in 1989. One man – not ‘Trane, not Hartman – was common to both recordings.

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Music review: Iris Dement, Elina Duni

Over the last year no “female vocal” albums have moved me more deeply. In their different ways, each defies description, and is a very “unlikely” success. Respectively, they were recorded in the singer’s living room in Iowa, and in a studio in south-east France. Iris Dement interprets Russian poetry, in a manner no one else would ever have attempted… or imagined.  Elina Duni addresses poetry and traditional song from her birthplace, Albania…with three brilliant Swiss jazzmen.

 

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Word power: “Do elephants have souls?”

What elephants may be lacking most of all is not language but the Rosetta Stone to prove they have it and clue us in to what on God’s green earth they’re talking about all the time…. They have a vocal range of ten octaves (a piano has seven), and up to three-quarters of the sounds they produce are inaudible to human ears. 

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Music review: Chris Abrahams, Lloyd Swanton

For nearly three decades Chris Abrahams and Lloyd Swanton have been two thirds of The Necks.

That singular Australian trio is renowned worldwide, but its members do many other good, highly diverse musical things.

Chris Abrahams’ Climb and Lloyd Swanton’s Ambon are wonderful, in very different ways.  Climb is all piano, solo. Ambon involves a shifting cast of thirteen…and a true story both dreadful and inspirational.

 

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Wine review: two excellent, affordable W.A. Chardonnays

Stella Bella 2014 Chardonnay and Castle Rock 2014 Diletti Chardonnay are available for circa $30 a bottle in Australia.  Respectively, from Margaret River and Porongurup, each is distinctly different. Both are clearly superior to a lot of more expensive Australian Chardonnays.

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