Skip to content →

Kimberley Coast (1): Berkeley River (1)

The Kimberley, in far northern Western Australia, includes the tropical world’s most substantial wilderness coast. The Berkeley is one of its wild rivers.

We visited its mouth and lower reaches in March 2016 when remarkably little rain had arrived; this “should” have been the latter part of the wet season.

The Kimberley’s climate is hot, harsh, monsoonal and very unreliable.

So, water was not rushing down the river’s oft-vertical sides in myriad falls, but this was/is a magnificent place.

 

copyright Doug Spencer
copyright Doug Spencer

 

That morning surprisingly little wildlife was visible.  We saw one turtle and just a few water birds – no crocodiles.

Doubtless, crocs were in the water, just as rock wallabies must have been somewhere nearby, at a safe height.

The Kimberley’s tides are the tropical world’s largest and most powerful; “safe height” is enormously variable.

(in the entire world, only Canada’s Bay of Fundy has greater tides)

Our destination was a quasi-permanent fall, circa 40 minutes upstream; a “nameless” waterfall, at least to the knowledge of our guide, who had many times visited it.

 

Waterfall, flowing into Berkeley River. Copyright Doug Spencer
Waterfall, flowing into Berkeley River. Copyright Doug Spencer

Shortly after I had “showered” at the bottom of the falls I heard the unmistakable sound of black cockatoos.  I looked up and across to the far side…

 

Cockatoos and midday sky over the Berkeley River. Copyright Doug Spencer
Cockatoos and midday sky over the Berkeley River. Copyright Doug Spencer

 

Berkeley River (2) – to be posted in a week or so – will offer some closer views and some links to more information.

 

 

 

Published in nature and travel photographs Western Australia

One Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *